Quantcast

N. Lebanon High School students learn to build their own guitars - abc27 WHTM

N. Lebanon High School students learn to build their own guitars

Posted: Updated:
  • Let's Go PlacesMore>>

  • Historic Ferry Boat Operation Still Draws Riders

    Historic Ferry Boat Operation Still Draws Riders

    Historic Ferry Boat Operation Still Draws Riders

    Tuesday, August 26 2014 9:16 AM EDT2014-08-26 13:16:25 GMT
    It's only a one mile journey in distance, but it covers nearly two centuries in time."People come to enjoy the river," said Don Lebo, as he guided another load of vehicles onto the Roaring Bull V. "They come to enjoy the scenery and to enjoy the wildlife."Lebo should know. He's been at the helm of the Roaring Bull V and the Falcon III ferry boats for 25 years.The 20 minute trip across the Susquehanna River dates back to the early 1800's when the Millersburg Ferry system first became official....More >>
    It's only a one mile journey in distance, but it covers nearly two centuries in time."People come to enjoy the river," said Don Lebo, as he guided another load of vehicles onto the Roaring Bull V. "They come to enjoy the scenery and to enjoy the wildlife."Lebo should know. He's been at the helm of the Roaring Bull V and the Falcon III ferry boats for 25 years.The 20 minute trip across the Susquehanna River dates back to the early 1800's when the Millersburg Ferry system first became official....More >>
  • Book Trilogy Traces Elizabethville Woman's West Virginia Roots.

    Book Trilogy Traces Elizabethville Woman's West Virginia Roots.

    Book Trilogy Traces Elizabethville Woman's West Virginia Roots.

    Friday, August 22 2014 8:59 AM EDT2014-08-22 12:59:44 GMT
    For many of her 87 years, Anna Jean Bennett Ditty was told, "You ought to write a book!" So, ten years ago, she did. In fact, she needed three books to cover her life, starting with "The House on the Hill," about growing up with three siblings in a small West Virginia town during the depression, with a hard-working mom and an absentee father.Browsing through her first book, Ditty paused to point out a childhood picture of her baby brother Dickie."He's my baby brother," she said. "My momma alw...More >>
    For many of her 87 years, Anna Jean Bennett Ditty was told, "You ought to write a book!" So, ten years ago, she did. In fact, she needed three books to cover her life, starting with "The House on the Hill," about growing up with three siblings in a small West Virginia town during the depression, with a hard-working mom and an absentee father.Browsing through her first book, Ditty paused to point out a childhood picture of her baby brother Dickie."He's my baby brother," she said. "My momma alw...More >>
  • Perry County Church Given New Life

    Perry County Church Given New Life

    Perry County Church Given New Life

    Tuesday, August 19 2014 11:02 AM EDT2014-08-19 15:02:59 GMT
    A big reason why Darlene Barrick fought to save the Mahanoy Union Church from bulldozers lies in the small cemetery next to it."This is Ulysses Grant Baker. My grandfather Baker," said Barrick, pointing to one of several headstones in the church cemetery with direct family ties. "He helped build the church."At another stone she added, "This is my Uncle Albert who fought in World War One."Since closing in the early 1960's, the church suffered heavily from neglect and vandalism. But stepping in...More >>
    A big reason why Darlene Barrick fought to save the Mahanoy Union Church from bulldozers lies in the small cemetery next to it."This is Ulysses Grant Baker. My grandfather Baker," said Barrick, pointing to one of several headstones in the church cemetery with direct family ties. "He helped build the church."At another stone she added, "This is my Uncle Albert who fought in World War One."Since closing in the early 1960's, the church suffered heavily from neglect and vandalism. But stepping in...More >>

With school about to resume in a few weeks, we're taking a look at the midstate's "School of Rock":
a course at Northern Lebanon High School where students learn how to make an instrument.

In James Hoffer's technical education class, it might sound like a rock concert, but it's actually final exams. Students finishing up and presenting their year-long project: electric guitars they designed and built.

"Is the instrument playable?," Hoffer asks the students. "That was one of your design briefs. It had to be a tunable, playable guitar when you walked out."

This is a pilot program at Northern Lebanon High School involving students using science, technology, egineering and math -- and having fun doing it. They are combining woodworking, electronic and artistic skills to make something to be admired and played. Not all the kids play guitar, but they all learned skills they can use through life.

Junior Josh Goodwin said the experience is enriching and holistic. 

"You learn wood working, circuitry, electronics ... and how to into a working guitar," Goodwin said. 

The guitar building program was initiated through a grant from the National Science Foundation aimed at getting students excited about using math and science concepts in hands-on projects that appeal to teenagers.

"Your finish looks nice," Hoffer comments on a student's guitar. "I see all that beautiful grain in there. Now, does it play?"

Through the elective course, the students not only build guitars, they build teamwork by making sure classmates stay on track and offering advice and help when needed.  

When they're done, they ear more than a letter grade.

Senior Alex Gardner said his guitar hold special memories.

"It's got a lot of sentimental value. It means a lot to me. It's something I can keep the rest of my life. It's ... real special."

Powered by WorldNow