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Midstate Non-profit group in the 'Bin-ness' of helping - abc27 WHTM

Midstate Non-profit group in the 'Bin-ness' of helping

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In only its third year in business, the Community Aid thrift store on the West Shore is bustling.

Aisles are crowded with bargain-hunting shoppers, saving money and helping others.

They're looking for wall to wall bargains on used clothing collected from Community Aid drop off bins scattered throughout the Midstate. It's a business started when founder Glenn Chandler was looking to combine his retailing skills with his faith.

"I wanted to serve God and the community and keep everything local," he said. " The proceeds from the resale of used clothing is going to go somewhere. Why not keep it right here in our backyard?"

Mountains of used clothing from the bins are brought to the Mechanicsburg store, or their sister store in Hanover, where they're sorted, separated, priced and put on racks.

"The average garment is about three bucks in the store," noted Chandler. "And only a dollar fifty on Wednesdays . That's half price. You can't beat it."

Proceeds from the sales benefit numerous Community Aid partners that allow the bins to be placed on their properties in exchange for a share of the profits. The Abundant Harvest church in Duncannon is one of those partners and credits Community Aid for doing wonders for the church's Tabitha House program that helps struggling families.

"Tabitha House has reached about seven or eight families in the last two years," noted senior pastor Matt Zang. "And, without Community Aid's financial impact, that number would be reduced to one or two."

Signs with the names of organizations benefiting from Community Aid partnerships are posted throughout the Mechanicsburg and Hanover stores, noting the amount each organization has received to date. That tally of assistance funds continues to grow every month, surprising even Community Aid's founder.

"I never, ever thought that, after three years, we'd be close to giving away 2-million dollars," said Chandler. "That is a remarkable amount."

Out and about, where they're benefiting from bins, I'm Chuck Rhodes for abc 27 News.

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