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Experts Say Winter Weather Doesn't Stop Spring Gardening - abc27 WHTM

Experts Say Winter Weather Doesn't Stop Spring Gardening

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Danville, VA-- If you've done any work in your yard yet, this snowfall may have come as a bit of a shock, especially if you've planted anything. We've got some answers to calm your worries.

Folks at Home Depot in Danville and they say don't let this winter weather scare you from getting your hands dirty. They say now's the best time to do it, you just need to take a few precautions.

We're almost one week into spring and it still looks and feels like winter. Rain, sleet, and some snow coated houses, trees and cars.

So, what does this snowy weather mean for spring gardeners? Home Depot Garden Manager Tony Dean said don't sweat, there's not much to worry about.

"You don't have to be scared to start your gardens right now," said Dean.

There are, however, some steps to take when the weather dips under 30 degrees.

"If they already an established garden, just get some 6 mil plastic, cover your plants at night or during the day if the weather does drop," said Dean. "But you kind of want to raise it off the plant, that way, if the plastic is touching the plant, it will actually burn the plant if the plastic freezes itself."

Home Depot also said there are some types of plants, that you can get around this season that actually withstand winter weather.

"If you do have pansies, they are annuals, but they're special annuals where they can actually survive lower temperatures," said Dean.  "So as long as it's in the 30s or above, it's actually safe for them to not be covered."

If you haven't started your gardening yet, keep this in mind.

"If customers are scared of gardening because of the weather, they an actually do container gardening, go ahead and plant stuff in containers, keep them inside, once that weather breaks, they can actually start establishing that stuff outside," said Dean.

Home Depot also suggests buying plants with card indicators that tell you what type of temperatures your plants can handle.

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