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Big time birthday for a Perry County town - abc27 WHTM

Big time birthday for a Perry County town

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  • Teenagers Earn Their Wings in Lebanon County

    Teenagers Earn Their Wings in Lebanon County

    Teenagers Earn Their Wings in Lebanon County

    Monday, July 21 2014 9:20 AM EDT2014-07-21 13:20:20 GMT
    At Farmer's Pride Airport in Fredericksburg, it was a summer school like none other. Nine days of learning about and flying glider planes. A unique chance for 16 Civil Air Patrol cadets to expand their abilities in aeronautics and in life.James Linker, Director, Civil Air Patrol Northeast Region,said the participants learn critical thinking skills that carry over into any walk of life."Primarily, it's an aviation exercise," said Linker, "but it's a great skill-building exercise too."Before, d...More >>
    At Farmer's Pride Airport in Fredericksburg, it was a summer school like none other. Nine days of learning about and flying glider planes. A unique chance for 16 Civil Air Patrol cadets to expand their abilities in aeronautics and in life.James Linker, Director, Civil Air Patrol Northeast Region,said the participants learn critical thinking skills that carry over into any walk of life."Primarily, it's an aviation exercise," said Linker, "but it's a great skill-building exercise too."Before, d...More >>
  • Autoharp Gathering in Perry County Draws Worldwide Participants

    Autoharp Gathering in Perry County Draws Worldwide Participants

    Autoharp Gathering in Perry County Draws Worldwide Participants

    Friday, July 11 2014 11:08 AM EDT2014-07-11 15:08:08 GMT
    For five days at the end of June, it was all things Autoharp at Little Buffalo State Park near Newport."We have people from Germany, Italy, Japan, France, Canada and from almost every state," said Neal Walters, Director of the 24th Annual Mountain Laurel Autoharp Gathering.Throughout the festival, workshops focused on playing techniques geared for all talent levels for the multi-stringed instrument from the zither family. There was even a seminar on how to play in front of an audience.Worksho...More >>
    For five days at the end of June, it was all things Autoharp at Little Buffalo State Park near Newport."We have people from Germany, Italy, Japan, France, Canada and from almost every state," said Neal Walters, Director of the 24th Annual Mountain Laurel Autoharp Gathering.Throughout the festival, workshops focused on playing techniques geared for all talent levels for the multi-stringed instrument from the zither family. There was even a seminar on how to play in front of an audience.Worksho...More >>
  • Dickinson College Experience Includes Cows and Plows

    Dickinson College Experience Includes Cows and Plows

    Dickinson College Experience Includes Cows and Plows

    Monday, July 7 2014 9:54 AM EDT2014-07-07 13:54:09 GMT
    At first glance, it just looks like another beautiful farm in Cumberland county. But this 50 acre spread near Boiling Springs has roots in academia.It's Dickinson College Farm. 12 acres of organic vegetables and 18 acres of animal pasture with supervised student employees and volunteers tackling the daily chores.Farm Manager Jenn Halpin says working on the farm has many benefits for the students involved."I think, through the work in the hot sun and in all the elements, whether it's a beautif...More >>
    At first glance, it just looks like another beautiful farm in Cumberland county. But this 50 acre spread near Boiling Springs has roots in academia.It's Dickinson College Farm. 12 acres of organic vegetables and 18 acres of animal pasture with supervised student employees and volunteers tackling the daily chores.Farm Manager Jenn Halpin says working on the farm has many benefits for the students involved."I think, through the work in the hot sun and in all the elements, whether it's a beautif...More >>

It's a welcome mat of beauty surrounding this western Perry county community. It's a town named after mill owner James Blaine, 250 years ago. The "e" in Blain has since disappeared, but not the small town feel enjoyed by the borough's 305 residents.

"Dad likes to set on the porch. And people will go by and they'll wave. They'll blow the horn," said his daughter Joan Stone.

Her dad is 96 year old Ken Morrow, a retired farmer who says he loves living where some people call "out in the sticks."

"It is out, but, I guess you have to be kind of used to that," said Morrow. But, I don't think we'd trade it for city life, no time."

In its earliest days, Blain's early economy was built around mills, tanneries, farms and the railroad, with small businesses lining downtown's dirt streets. Today, farming is still big in Sherman's Valley, and mom and pop stores remain a vital part of Blain's commerce. It's a place where one's faith and old glory are always in season. It's where the lions club and Heritage Days are a big deal. And, downtown traffic is safe enough for four legged residents. Looking ahead for Blain, Mayor Don Smith says blending the town's past with its future is a priority

"We want to try our utmost best to bring it (Blain) back, similar to what it was, as far as the buildings and the upkeep," said Smith.

One of those believing in Blain's future is the new owner of the town's landmark Blain Hotel, Janel Beaston.

"It's a very close knit community and anybody would do anything for you," said Beaston. "Everybody knows each other. If you need something, you go ask your neighbor to help."

And for anyone visiting Blain for the first time, life-long resident Joan Stone had this advice: "Relax. Enjoy the scenery and smell the roses."

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