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Missing Monkey Found! - abc27 WHTM

Missing Monkey Found!

Posted: Updated:
FAIRFIELD, Pa. (WHTM) -

**********UPDATE**********

The East Coast Exotic Animal Rescue in Adams County announced on its Facebook page that their missing monkey has been found. They say he was eating the cat food on a woman's deck.  He's now said to be back home at the rescue and doing well.

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At the East Coast Exotic Animal Rescue in Adams County, the rescues go both ways.

It was one of their dogs that woke up Suzanne Murray and her family to a fire burning on their property. Almost 200 creatures call the sanctuary home, including a 12-year-old Capuchin monkey named Bug.

"He's my third son," Murray said.

Born of two lab animals, Murray has raised Bug since he was two weeks old. Her voice is now hoarse from calling his name.

"I thought that if he heard my voice then he wouldn't go further," she said.

Bug has been missing since early Saturday morning, when fire officials say an electrical fire started in the home where many of the animals were housed.

"The chaos of the fire was a lot more overcoming than the sound of the animals," Fairfield Deputy Fire Chief Adam Jacobs said.

Once crews deemed it safe enough, they allowed Murray and others to start removing animals.

"This is the first time I've ever seen any monkeys on a fire call," Jacobs said.

Two cats died. Outside, a frightened Bug got loose during a cage transfer. His close friend Pia now swings alone.

"When we get them they are unwanted pets, they are lab animals and zoo animals and it's not their fault," said Murray. "I'm not an expert of anything. I just know they get taken care of and loved."

While his name is Bug, Murray says he is actually most fond of gummy bears.

Not only are they trying to lure him with food, but they plan to gather friends to move down the hill beside the facility where Bug is believed to be and push him closer to home.

While Capuchin monkeys can stay close to home, in the wild they are known to travel around two miles a day.


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