Update 4:30 p.m.: Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) are on their way to Panama City to investigate the plane crash. They are expected to arrive Thursday morning.

“Early evening last night we were notified that an airplane on final approach didn’t land on the runway,” Northwest Florida Beaches International Executive Director Parker McClellan said. “Which means that we activated our emergency plan and began the process of trying to locate the airplane.”

Investigators used drones to find the downed plane early Wednesday morning.

Local authorities have handed the investigation over to the NTSB and FAA. The NTSB will lead the investigation.

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The NTSB plans to file a preliminary report within the next two weeks. The full investigation to find out why the plane crashed could take two years.

Update 12:30 p.m.: One of the victims in the Tuesday night plane crash in Panama City Beach was the President and CEO of a Michigan health system.

Bay County Sheriff’s investigators said the Cessna plane disappeared from radar at about 7 pm on Tuesday. The plane flew from Michigan to McMinnville, Tennessee before heading to Bay County, they added. 

The plane disappeared from radar about two miles from the airport and was located about one mile north of the northbound runway in a densely wooded area. The couple in the plane were husband and wife, Donald and Diane Slattery, deputies wrote. Donald Slattery was the owner of the airplane. 

Diane Postler-Slattery, 62, was the president and CEO of MyMichigan Health, a non-profit health system headquartered in Midland, Michigan. A news release on the organization’s website identifies her as Diane Postler-Slattery.

“This is a great tragedy for our health system,” said Greg Rogers, executive vice president and chief operating officer, MyMichigan Health. “Diane was a strong, passionate and inspirational leader and was beloved by her family, friends and colleagues. We ask that you keep her family and friends in your thoughts and prayers, and that you respect their privacy during this difficult time.”

PANAMA CITY BEACH, Fla. (WMBB) — The couple killed in a plane crash near the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport were identified Wednesday morning.

Bay County Sheriff’s investigators said the Cessna plane disappeared from radar at about 7 pm on Tuesday. The plane flew from Michigan to McMinnville, Tennessee before heading to Bay County, they added. 

The plane disappeared from radar about two miles from the airport and was located about one mile north of the northbound runway in a densely wooded area. The couple in the plane were husband and wife, Donald and Diane Slattery, deputies wrote. Donald Slattery was the owner of the airplane. 

“The Bay County Sheriff’s Office, the FWC, Airport Police, the Panama City Police Department, and the Panama City Beach Police Department worked together and were able to locate the crashed plane with the help of drones,” deputies wrote. “The BCSO Criminal Investigations and Crime Scene Unit have been on the scene most of the night conducting a forensic examination of the scene.”

The bodies were turned over to the Medical Examiner’s Office for autopsy.  

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the FAA are taking over the investigation. 

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BAY COUNTY, Fla. (WMBB) — Two people are dead after a plane crashed near the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport, according to the Bay County Sheriff’s Office.

Officials said Wednesday morning that the plane was located in a densely wooded area near the airport. The two people found dead were in the plane.

The investigation into the missing plane began Tuesday night around 7 p.m. According to the sheriff’s office, the plane disappeared from radar during an approach to ECP Airport.

The search took place in a heavily-wooded area two miles north of the airport.

The Bay County Sheriff’s Office said the investigation will now be turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration.