Which Midstate counties plan to defy Governor’s order, move to “yellow”

Coronavirus in Pennsylvania

HARRISBURG, Pa. (WHTM) — Lawmakers and county officials across the Midstate have been requesting to be moved to the “yellow” phase of reopening more quickly, or saying they’ll defy the Governor’s order and reopen without his permission.

It comes as the state has been shut down for almost two months.

Officials in Dauphin, Lebanon, and Franklin counties plan to move to “yellow” Friday with or without Governor Tom Wolf’s approval.

York, Adams, and Perry county officials wrote letters requesting to be moved out of the “red” phase.

Lawmakers representing Mifflin and Juniata counties are demanding the Governor reevaluate whether their areas can reopen.

In Cumberland County, the sheriff’s office stated it will, “not be enforcing any “order” that violates our Constitutional Rights.”

Lancaster County leaders hired a public health adviser, and are asking for change starting May 15, but say they too will move forward even if they don’t have the Governor’s permission.

Meanwhile, Lancaster Mayor Danene Sorace posted on Facebook, saying the county is not prepared, and the city will be following the state’s guidelines.

“Our actions now will either set us up for success or failure against a foe that cares nothing about politics,” said Sorace.

The state has continued to say in order to reopen, counties must have fewer than 50 new cases per 100,000 people in a 14-day period.

Other factors being considered are if there’s enough testing available for people with symptoms, if high-risk settings have safeguards in place and if officials are doing contact tracing.

There are also some businesses, like Round the Clock Diner in York, that either have opened or plan to open, despite any advisories or orders.

So far, Pennsylvania State Police has taken the approach of informing over enforcing and penalizing, though troopers are able to enforce the order.

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