Midwives weigh in on buzz over Meghan Markle’s home birth plan

Local

There’s been a lot of buzz about Meghan Markle’s home birth plan.

“It brings the topic up again amongst women,” certified nurse midwife Sandra Hoops said.

Prince Harry and his wife welcomed a baby boy Monday morning, spurring a conversation about home births and the importance of carefully planning them.

“You have to be willing to take on the extra responsibility that comes with it. There are certain supplies you need to get: a bucket, some towels, some clothes for baby, a fan,” certified nurse midwife Kelly Biagio said.

Being the right candidate, one with no risk factors is critical.

“They’re going to screen those patients, and so, you’re not going to have someone with hypertension and a previous C-section and other things delivering at home, so the risks are small,” said Hoops.

“And if anything comes up throughout pregnancy at any point in time, you can risk out of a home birth and need to transfer to a hospital setting,” said Biagio.

Hoops and Biagiio are certified nurse midwives, but unlike Biagio who only makes house calls, Hoops delivers babies solely in the hospital setting.

“There’s no use of medications such as epidurals and narcotics in a home birth,” said Hoops.

But the planning beforehand is similar to delivering in a hospital.

“You see someone every four weeks up until 28 weeks, every two weeks until 36, and then every week until birth,” said Biagio.

According to the CDC, “Although out-of-hospital births are still rare in the United States, they’ve been increasing recently,” something Biagio has seen over the years.

“I’m full for the rest of the year. I don’t have any openings until January,” said Biagio.

Bottom line: if you’re looking for a more personal experience when you give birth and are a generally healthy woman, a home birth could be a good option. 

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