CUMBERLAND COUNTY, Pa. (WHTM) — The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) notified Cumberland County that a second mosquito from the county has tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV). The mosquito came from Middlesex Township.

The DEP’s Vector Control Office is monitoring mosquito activity in the county while also applying mosquito controls as needed. The Vector Control Office set up a collection trap in Middlesex Township near the positive mosquito’s location.

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Standing water in Middlesex Township is also being tested by the DEP to determine if it needs treatment or removal.

The county’s first positive mosquito for West Nile Virus in 2022 was collected in Dickinson Township in early June.

You can help prevent the spread of mosquito-carried diseases by:

  • Using mosquito repellants, wearing longs sleeved shirts and pants.
  • Taking extra precautions around dusk, the peak of female mosquito feeding.
  • Securing window and doors screens, so mosquitos can’t make it into your home.
  • Eliminating stagnate water around your property.
  • Treating water sources that cannot be drained, mosquito dunks or bits that contain Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), which kills larvae. These products are safe for use around humans, and pets and can be found at hardware stores and other local retailers.

Mosquitoes transmit WNV by feeding on infected birds and then biting another bird, animal, or human.

Cumberland County’s WNV program applies an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) to control mosquitos in the area and limit mosquitoes’ effect on people and the environment.

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West Nile Virus is not spread from person-to-person contact. Only approximately 20% of people infected with WNV will develop symptoms, called the West Nile Fever, such as aches, fever, rashes, and swollen lymph nodes.

With rest and fluids, most people can recover from WNV in a few days. less than 1% of all WNV infections lead to life-threatening conditions.

For more information, visit www.ccpa.net/vector.

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