What’s Going Around: Influenza, stomach bug, COVID-19, strep throat

What's Going Around

WellSpan pediatric medicine physicians across the Midstate are seeing acute asthma exacerbations, hand, foot and mouth, mono, stomach bugs and viral upper respiratory illnesses.

Among the viral illnesses they’re treating are adenovirus, COVID-19, influenza, human metapneumovirus, parainfluenza and RSV.

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They’re also seeing patients with anxiety, depression and concerns related to school.

Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health Physicians Roseville Pediatrics says the flu has hit hard this week.

They also saw an increase in COVID-19 and strep throat.

There is a stomach bug that has persisted and is causing five to seven days of symptoms in some cases.

They are also seeing viral illnesses, ear infections, sinusitis and pneumonia.

Dr. Joan Thode offered the following advice about the flu:

“The typical flu course includes four to six days of high fevers and chills, as well as muscle aches, headache, sore throat, congestion and cough. Vomiting and diarrhea are not typically part of the flu syndrome. While the fevers generally go away after five or six days, kids often experience weakness and lower energy for about a week after as their body recuperates.

High fevers are the most common symptom of the flu. The number of the fever doesn’t matter—it’s how your child looks. Doctors worry a lot more about a child who is limp or hard to arouse with a temperature of 101 degrees than a child who is walking and hydrating but at 104 degrees. The child’s activity level, muscle tone, and ability to respond to you are bigger indicators for level of concern than the number of fever degrees.

Reasons to bring your child to medical evaluation include: five consecutive days of fever; respiratory distress or labored breathing; fevers that come back after one or two days of no fever within the same illness; cough that does not improve after about two weeks; a new rash that occurs during the illness; new or worsening pain anywhere during the illness.

If you haven’t already protected your child with a flu vaccine, it’s not too late.”

This week pediatricians at Penn State Health Children’s Hospital and Penn State Health Medical Group are seeing patients with COVID-19, viral respiratory infections, colds, bronchitis, and strep throat.

The CVS MinuteClinic in York was busy will wellness visits, COVID-19 vaccines, and flu shots.

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